Global Wildland Fire Network

Global Fire Monitoring Center (GFMC) and Global Wildland Fire Network (GWFN) Mission Statement

The mandate of the Global Fire Monitoring Center (GFMC) and the Global Wildland Fire Network (GWFN), a global voluntary network, is to provide policy advice and to facilitate science and technology transfer to enable nations

– to reduce the negative impacts of vegetation fires (“wildland fires”) on the environment and humanity, and

– to advance the knowledge and application of the ecologically and environmentally benign role of natural fire in fire-dependent ecosystems, and sustainable application of fire in land-use systems.

Note: In 2001 the IUCN and GFMC initiated that the theme of „Wildland Fire“ became one of four Working Groups of the UNISDR Inter-Agency Task Force for Disaster Reduction (http://www.unisdr.org/2005/task-force/tf-working-groups4-eng.htm) and transited to the Global Wildland Fire Network (GWFN). The GFMC inherited the seat of IUCN in the Inter-Agency Task Force. Under the new setting GFMC / GWFN are now a UNISDR Thematic Platform (http://www.unisdr.org/partners/thematic-platforms).

Website of the Global Wildland Fire Network with 14 Regional Websites:

The Global Fire Monitoring Center (GFMC) is an institution of the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science, located on the campus of Freiburg University, Germany. Since 2005 GFMC is an Associated Institute of the United Nations University (UNU). See more…

Forest and Land Fire this synergy diplomatic need a strong and sustainable between countries in handle scene land and forest fire continuous upon in southeast asia region.Source: http://gfmc.online/globalnetworks/southeastasia/asean-firenet.html

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This page provides information related to readers of the website that are below the GFMC by providing access to a wide range of national and institutional sources to describe the information, publications, data monitoring, early warning system, and management in prevention efforts forest and land fire. See more…

The International Peatland Fire Network: Rationale and Introduction

Peatlands are occurring in all vegetation zones and in the majority of countries throughout the world. They represent a large reservoir of terrestrial carbon that has been accumulated since the last ice age – tentatively a total of up 500 billion tonnes. Many peatland sites have been drained and cultivated with the help of fire for hundreds of years. Nowadays we are recognizing that the remaining peatlands represent important refugia for biodiversity. See more…